George
Washington
Jessup Jr.


GEORGE WASHINGTON JESSUP JR. was born on the family farm at Jessup's Mills in Gloucester County NJ on December 18, 1849. After completing his education with a two years course at the Bridgeton Academy, he worked in Philadelphia for four years. He married in 1873. A son, Charles G. Jessup was born, but sadly, his wife Abigail passed away in January of 1874. George Jessup moved to York PA for about eighteen months, returning to Philadelphia in 1877, accepting a position as a traveling salesman for C.H. Gardner & Co., a large hat dealer. George Jessup spent eleven years in this position, covering every state in the Union and traveling to Europe twice. During this period he remarried, but again became a widower when his wife passed in 1883. By 1887 he had moved to Camden, making his home at 416 North 5th Street.

George W. Jessup left the hat business in 1890, and went into the real estate business in Camden NJ, with George H. Fairfield. He soon bought Fairfield out, and after bringing his son Charles into the firm on December 1, 1895, renamed his business G.W. Jessup & Son. He also remarried, in June of 1895 to Miss Esther Carr of Trenton NJ.

George W. Jessup was involved in some of the largest real estate transactions in Camden in the 1890s, including the land for the site of the Sixth Regiment Armory, the land for First Methodist Episcopal Church at 6th and Stevens Streets, the Edward N. Cohn and the Markley properties, the George H. Munger property, and the land for the Camden Electric Light and Heating Company. 

George W. Jessup was one of the incorporators of the Masonic Building at 415 Market Street, also known as the Temple Theater, where his offices were located. He was made Secretary of the Board of Trade, an early version of the Chamber of Commerce, in 1892. He also served as Director and Vice-President of the Provident Building and Loan Association. 

George Jessup was very concerned with fairness in taxation. He spent considerable effort in reducing the tax assessment in Camden, and through his activity in the Board of Trade, took his views state-wide. In September of 1896 he spoke on the subject in Trenton on a meeting of the various Boards of Trade throughout the state. At this meeting he read from a paper where he stated, "A man who owns his own home will never be an anarchist." At this meeting he urged reform of the poll, school, and personal taxes at the upcoming session of the New Jersey State Legislature, and announced that he had a skeleton bill drafted on the poll tax.

In April of 1901 George W. Jessup arranged for the purchase of 15 farms for H.C. Frick of Pittsburgh in the area lying between Gloucester City and Mount Ephraim. 

In April of 1902 he was involved in plans to form a state Board of Trade.

In October of 1903 the Philadelphia Worsted Company, located in Camden was declared insolvent. George W. Jessup was appointed receiver by the court. 

In 1905 he founded, with his son and George H.B. Martin, the City and Suburban Realty Company in Camden. He eventually moved the offices of this company to West Collingswood. This company dealt in real estate and building construction. He was very much a part of developing the towns that sprung up along the White Horse Pike in the early part of the 20th Century. On January 9, 1909 George W. Jessup became a director of the Camden Safe Deposit & Trust Company. Also in January of 1909 George Jessup incorporated the Haddon Heights Park Company with his son and Charles A. Reynolds to deal in real estate and as builders and contractors. In March of 1909 he incorporated the Haddon Highlands Company, again with his son and Charles A. Reynolds to deal in real estate.

By 1920 he was living in an apartment at 532 Cooper Street with his wife, Esther. In these years Esther Jessup was a member of the Woman's Club of Camden, N.J. Also living in this building were banker Burleigh Draper, and businessman T. Yorke Smith. Melbourne F. Middleton Jr. lived next door at 538 Cooper Street. By 1930 he was retired, and living with his wife Esther at 214 Cooper Street. George W. Jessup passed away on March 28, 1932 in Camden.

George W. Jessup was a Mason, a member of Camden Lodge No. 15 A.F.& A.M.; and also was a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church.  

Philadelphia Inquirer - January 3, 1895

Masonic Temple Association
George Pfeiffer Jr. - Cooper B. Hatch
William H. Fredericks - Thomas McDowell - J.R. Eastlack 
Alfred Cramer - D.H. Gomersall - E.A. Austermuhl
Isaac Doughten -
H.B. Anthony - William S. Casselman
P. Weatherby - Wilbur F. Rose -
George W. Jessup

Philadelphia Inquirer - October 20, 1895

Click on Images for COMPLETE Article of goings-on in Camden

Biographical Review - 1897



Philadelphia Inquirer - February 3, 1898
Click on Image for PDF File of Complete Article

...continued...
George W. Jessup - David Baird Sr. - Thaddeus P. Varney - George Barrett - Harry F. Wolfe
Isaac Toone - John H. Fort - Philip Schmitz - O. Glen Stackhouse - Charles M. Baldwin
George R. Thompson - Frederick Kauffman - Benjamin Braker - David M. Chambers
William H. Davis - Dr. John W. Donges - Harry B. Paul 

Philadelphia Inquirer - March 18, 1898
Click on Image for PDF File of Complete Article

...continued...
Samuel Dodd - John Foster - H. Frank Pettit - John S. Roberts - Charles E. Day
George W. Jessup - Cooper B. Hatch - Edward V.D. Joline - Harry C. Kramer - Thaddeus P. Varney

Philadelphia Inquirer - November 24, 1898

...continued...

Samuel Hufty - Harry C. Kramer - George W. Jessup - Aaron Ward - Frank H. Burdsall - Chestnut Street
Lewis C. Mohrman -
Wright Cox - Logan Bates - Charles P. Sayrs -Thaddeus P. Varney


Philadelphia Inquirer * April 2, 1903
 

Frank Ford Patterson Jr.
F. Joseph Rouh
William Schmid
George W. Jessup
John Furey


Philadelphia Inquirer - January 28, 1908

...continued...
William Leonard Hurley - Charles H. Ellis - Charles V.D. Joline - Edmund E. Read
Harry C. Kramer - Howard Carrow - Philander Knox - James H. Davidson
Johm T. Dorrance -
E.G.C. Bleakly - David A. Henderson - Samuel W. Sparks
Henry C. Loudenslager - Francis Howell - Walter Wood - Elmer E. Long
George W. Jessup - Joseph Gaskill - Volney G. Bennett - Wilbur F. Rose
Alexander C. Wood - George A. Frey -
Charles A. Reynolds - E.B. Leaming
Heulings Lippincott - Charles K. Haddon - Fithian S. Simmons -
J.B. Van Sciver
David Jester -
Frank B. Sitley - Alpheus McCracken - Thomas S. Nekervis
DeCourcy May - Isaac Ferris - Lionel C. Simpson -  John M. Kelly
G. George Browning -
Watson Depuy - John C. Danenhower - John B. McFeeley
Elias Davis -
Anthony Kobus - Captain John B. Adams

Bank Directory - March 7, 1916

Camden Safe Deposit and Trust Company
Camden, N. J.

ALEXANDER C. WOOD, President.
EPHRAIM TOMLINSON, 2d Vice President
JOSEPH LIPPINCOTT, ,Treasurer and Secretary
EPHRAIM TOMLINSON, Trust Officer
GEORGE J. BERGEN, Solicitor

Directors:

Alexander C. Wood

Joseph W. Cooper

George Reynolds         

Ephraim Tomlinson 

Joseph H. Gaskill         

George W. Jessup

Edward L. Farr        

William Joyce Sewell, Jr.

Edmund E. Reed, Jr.

J. Dayton Voorhees

William J. Bradley       

Albert C. Middleton

George J. Bergen       

Report of Condition - The Bank's Balance Sheet


Camden Post-Telegram * May 1, 1918

...continued...
William P. Hallinger - Raymond L. Warren - Joseph H. Forsyth - Robert D. Clow - George W. Kirkbride
Meyers Baker - Howard A. Walton - George W. Jessup - William B. Hambleton - Johan A. Ackley
Frank Burr - R.A. Rockhill - Maurice B. Rudderow - Ralph D. Baker - Edgar Freeman - William Schmidt
Charles G. Jessup - Clinton I. Evans - Anthony J. Oberst - Leon E. Todd - William Derham - T. Yorke Smith Eldred I. Hibbs - Henry Budney - Carl Evered - Francis C. Ely - William Schmid

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